My Mom would become my first example of make-up perfection. Her lashes, her blush...everything was studied. And at 13, I was allowed to enter this amazing world of frost and color.

 

I can recall the older girls in the neighborhood with their Bonnie bell scented lipgloss and Avon Blue eyeshadow. I could barely wait until I would be allowed to wear it. 

These days, make-up is an essential part of many little girls' lives in real life or in play. Mommy is no longer the only person with cosmetics know/how. Strangers have entered your child's life right through their phones on YouTube. 

There are 400 channels and the most popular have over 10 million subscribers. So even the tween set can have arched brows, perfect pouts, highlighted cheekbones, and a perfected cat eye.

 (photo:@jamescharles)

But just how young is too young? Are we actually telling kids their fresh faces aren't enough?

Most kids are aware of YouTube by the age of seven years old. And this number appears to be getting younger every year. Is this much different than smearing your mom's lipstick on and trying on her high heels? Isn't it just a harmless creative outlet?

With an open mind, I watched kid friendly Youtuber, Meredith Foster. Her videos are aimed at the tween/teen market. To my surprise, they had much more in it then just make-up tutorials. "Kitchen Ready," "My Morning Routine," "24 Hour Shopping," "Christmas Ready in my New House" to name a few.

 (photo: Merideth Foster)

These are easy on the eye and edited in quick shots to keep you interested. There was nothing I found to be offensive. And they were fun in a voyeuristic kind of way and very good natured. So I understand the appeal.

Though, I couldn't help but wish kids were living their own lives instead of watching others live theirs. Am I old-fashioned? Or maybe this could be used as Mommy/Daughter time? 

Whichever you choose, know that you are still the most important role model your child will ever have. 

 

Adele D’Man
About The Author

Contributing Writer

@awendy4